The Scribbler

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Posts Tagged ‘film

The Informers trailer released

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The Informers movie poster

The Informers movie poster

The movie adaptation of The Informers by Bret Easton Ellis has finally had it’s first trailer released.

Published in 1995, the collection of loosely connected short stories captures a week in L.A. in 1983, featuring movie executives, rock stars, a vampire and other morally challenged characters in adventures laced with sex, drugs and violence.

Unfortunately the word on the grapevine is that the filmmakers have decided to omit the supernatural elements of the book from the film version.

The Informers is directed by Gregor Jordan (Buffalo Soldiers) and stars Billy Bob Thornton, Kim Basinger, Mickey Rourke, Winona Ryder, Rhys Ifans and Brad Renfro.

Already premiered at film festivals around the globe, The Informers will be released later this summer.

For all the latest information on the movie including reviews, footage, further trailers and hopefully the odd interview stay with The Scribbler.

To see the trailer click below:

Discussion:
What do you think of the trailer? It looks like the movie will do the book justice. What is your opinion? What are the best and worst movie adaptations in your view?

Words: Dean Samways

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Toby Young – A Master of nothing?

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Toby Young, author of How To Lose Friends and Alienate People

Toby Young, author of How To Lose Friends and Alienate People

To celebrate the DVD and Blu-Ray release of ‘How To Lose Friends and Alienate People’, The Scribbler talks to the author of the book that became one of the funniest movies of last year.

In an exclusive interview Toby Young talks about how he got into writing, what nurtured his talent and how the transformation from book to film transpired.

Enjoy our little chat with one of the most sought after writers of the twenty-first century below and leave a comment:

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THE SCRIBBLER: When, where and how did you first discover your flair for writing, and how was it nurtured early on?

TOBY YOUNG: Both my parents were published authors so, for me, writing a book wasn’t a particularly huge leap. Growing up, it was always something I thought I’d do. In addition, my father was always quite encouraging. From a very early age he used to tell me that I was a natural writer.

TS: What was it about working on The Danube that drove you to follow a career in journalism when you were, at the time, studying very different subjects?

TY: I studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics as a student — a subject known as PPE — and that is considered a typical degree for a journalist to take. I think a more pertinent question is why I didn’t go into current affairs journalism, why I tend to do the softer, more personal stuff, and that was something I fell into by accident. It was just easier to get published on the features page than the op ed page and, having come up that route, that’s the path I’m still on. But as I get older I find myself drifting more towards news and current affairs.

TS: You mentioned that as you get older you feel drawn to current affairs, how has that transition in writing styles and subjects been for you?

TY: I just mean that I enjoy appearing on programmes like Newsnight and Question Time – not that it happens very often!

The Sound of No Hands Clapping

'The Sound of No Hands Clapping'

TS: Can you describe the move you made from journalism to fiction writing? What differences exist between the two disciplines in terms of having to change your methods? Did you come across any difficulties and how did you overcome them?

TY: I’ve published very little fiction. My two books – ‘How To Lose Friends and Alienate
People’ and ‘The Sound of No Hands Clapping’ – are both non-fiction.

TS: While your two books are non-fiction some creativity must have gone into them, even if it was just finding ways of making scenes sound as colourful as possible.  How did you approach writing books like that? Are they not just mammoth features?

TY: I’ve read quite a few books on screenwriting and done Robert McKee’s screenwriting course a couple of times. I found that very helpful when it came to writing books. I think the principals of storytelling are universal, regardless of whether you’re writing fiction or non-fiction.

How To Lose Friends and Alienate People

'How To Lose Friends and Alienate People'

TS: How did ‘How To Lose Friends and Alienate People’ come about? Can you briefly describe the writing process of such an auto-biographical book. Was it as much fun writing it as it is reading it?

TY: I worked on the proposal for ‘How To Lose Friends’ for a couple of years, but, after I’d sold the book on the back of that, it only took me about six months to write. I’m not sure “fun” is the right word to use. Hunter S Thompson said, “I suspect writing is a bit like fucking, which is only fun for amateurs. Old whores don’t do much giggling.”

TS: To the majority of readers it would appear you’ve led quite the lifestyle. How do you intent to follow your two books? Do you think you’ll have to turn to fiction to convey the same messages and humour?

TY: Well, my life is certainly less exciting now that I’m married and have four children. I want to write more fiction, but it’s hard finding the time between all my other commitments.

TS: During the film making process of HTLF&AP was it difficult to let some of the book go in the production reasons? How much input did you have in the process?

TY: No, I didn’t find that at all difficult. William Goldman, the novelist and screenwriter, once told me that a writer has to learn how to murder his babies, but that came naturally to me. The producers of the film were initially a little wary of me because they thought I’d fight to preserve every last scene in the book, but when they realized I wasn’t going to do that they were much more open to my suggestions. I knew that if the book was going to be turned into a film it would have to be very different.

TS: Are you happy with the finished piece? Has is inspired you to do a bit of screenwriting?

TY: Yes, very happy. It’s a very entertaining film. On the screenwriting front, I caught that bug about twenty-five years ago and I’m still plugging away. Being involved in the making of a film hasn’t put me off in the slightest.

TS: As the hype over HTLF&AP the movie pipes up again with the release of the DVD what are your plans for the future?

TY: I’d like to keep writing books, plays, movie scripts, etc, but be paid a lot more for doing it.

TS: You’re a bit of a jack-of-all-trades when it comes to writing. Which discipline do you enjoy dabbling in the most and why?

TY: I like comedy writing the best, particularly devising comic scenes. If you can pull that off, it’s very satisfying, particularly when you hear people laughing in the theatre or the cinema.

TS: I was able to contact you quite freely without having to go through publicists or PR. Do you usually work with them?  For the budding writers out there, what are the pros and cons of working with such professionals?

TY: I worked with a PR company on How to Lose Friends & Alienate People, but generally speaking I don’t. As far as I can tell, the only advantage of forcing people who want to interview you to go through a PR company is that they take you more seriously.

TS: The Scribbler is dedicated to inspiring and advising would-be writers to get their material published. What is the best piece of advice you could give them, or you have ever been given concerning your work?

TY: When I was about 19 I bumped into Clive James at an airport and told him what a big fan I was of ‘Unreliable Memoirs’. He reciprocated by giving me a piece of advice that I’ve found very useful: Keep it personal. The important thing is to find your own voice, to write in a style that is unique to you. Once you can do that, the rest is easy.

TS: Just how personal are you prepared to go in your writing?  How much of yourself do you dare put into your work?

TY: I like to think I’m pretty open and honest, but it is easy to delude yourself about just how open and honest you’re being. That is to say, many people who write about themselves and their reactions to things claim to feel what they think they ought to feel, but which, in reality, they don’t. I don’t think they’re being straightforwardly deceptive – it’s more that the lies they tell themselves spill out on to the page — but it still has the smell of dishonesty about it. The really hard thing about personal writing is to be completely faithful to who you really are and not pretend to be the person you think you ought to be.

TS: What you up to at the moment?

TY: I have a few irons in the fire, but experience has taught me not to talk about anything until you’re ready to unveil it before the public because, so often, these projects come to nothing.

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Find Toby Young in cyberspace:

Watch Toby Young interview Simon Pegg (and vice versa) for The Culture Show below:

Discussion:
Are you a fan of Toby Young’s writing? Does the movie do HTLF&AP justice? Post your views, comments and start discussions in the comments box below.

Words: Dean Samways

‘How To Talk To Girls’ – The Film

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Alec Greven talking to Ellen DeGeneres on her chat show

Alec Greven talking to Ellen DeGeneres on her chat show

Little Alec Greven rise to super stardom goes from strength to strength as it was revealed earlier this week that his best selling book is to be turned into a film.

Twentieth Century Fox has picked up the film rights to How to Talk to Girls an advice guide penned by the nine-year-old.

According to the magazine Variety ‘How To Talk To Girls’ is the first of a four-part series. It was published on 25 November by HarperCollins, conveniently a sister company of Fox. The film deal covers all four publications.

Fox is still to appoint a writer or announce a producer for the film. Production co-president Alex Young is said to have liked Greven’s book.

‘How To Talk To Girls’ was originally a third-grade project, which resulted in a pamphlet that he went on to sell at his school’s book fair.

The advice in the book ranges from facts of life to how to get a girl’s attention, all from the unique perspective of a nine-year-old. Greven also offers advice on how to talk to girls, crushes, and how you should never act desperate. A given really.

To read the original news piece about Alec Greven’s surprise best-selling book click here.

Have a look below for a video featuring the writing boy wonder:

Discussion:
Is this a fad? It’s got to be a fad right?

Words: Dean Samways

Burroughs paints London town poppy red

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William S. Burroughs

William S. Burroughs

William Burroughs, author of cult classic The Naked Lunch and opium addict, is having some of his work put on show in two London exhibitions this December.

The tenth anniversary of the legendary writer, filmmaker and artist’s death will be marked by a public display of some of his previously unseen artworks.

Burrough’s first show will appear at the Riflemaker gallery in Soho. The exhibition, opening 9 December, will comprise over 100 abstract works the author painted on the inside of manila folders while he was penning some of his classic novels like The Naked Lunch and The Soft Machine.

Samples of this work leaked into the public sphere some two years ago and caused quite a stir, making December’s exhibition a much anticipated event for fans. What makes the display more unique is this will be the first time anywhere in the world that the complete collection of abstracts has been showcased.

Since his death in 1997 the works have been lying almost undiscovered in his Lawrance home in Kansa. During the last decade workers have been cataloguing the artist’s collections and this is the first to come out of their hard work.

Tot Taylor, director of the Riflemaker gallery, said: “The file-folders come from his bedroom. He was always thinking of different things. He would file his notes in the folders and paint the insides according to how the writings could be envisaged in art. The paintings are very beautiful, some are soothing; some are psychotic. The Burroughs estate is working slowly through his things, and these files have only recently come to light.

“Burroughs has been hugely influential among musicians because of his don’t-give-a-damn attitude. He was proud to be like that and was the originator of the Beatnik movement, which was hugely influential.”

The father of Beatnik’s London outing doesn’t stop there though. Starting 16 December at GSK Contemporary, Royal Academy, a collection of unseen films will be aired from their reel tins for the first time as well as other works.

Footage of the writer caught on camera reading his work will accompany portraits of the counter-culture icon by painters like David Hockney, and collaborations between the multi-talented Burroughs and other artists.

David Thorp, curator of GSK Contemporary said the show would inspire younger artists by demonstrating just how important he was to his own generation of artists.

“He was hugely influential as a presence with value outside the mainstream. He stands for something that is iconoclastic and anti-establishment in a romantic but robust way.”

For the diary:
‘Life-File: The Private File-Folders of William S Burroughs’ is at Riflemaker from 9 December ‘Burroughs Live’ forms part of GSK Contemporary at the Royal Academy from 16 December

Below is a snippet from a documentary wherein Burroughs discusses his time in London and his famed method of writing, ‘cut up’. Rest assured The Scribbler will explore Burroughs’ artistic techniques in much greater detail in the near future:

Words: Dean Samways

Written by Dean Samways

October 21, 2008 at 4:30 pm